News

Browse our collection of links to recent news stories about MITC, our members, and international trade topics of interest.


  • Maine boosts efforts to lure Chinese investors

    Maine trade officials are hoping Chinese investors’ $120 million bet on tissue papermaking in Baileyville signals the start of a stream of capital from Asia’s financial giant to the state. The Maine International Trade Center in January opened an office in Shanghai, seeing opportunity to target investors in specific areas, like food processing, aerospace and renewable energy, and earn a share of the increasingly large pie that is Chinese investment abroad. Read more
  • Sen. King co-founds caucus to put Maine on front line of Arctic issues

    Sen. Angus King is partnering with Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska to influence U.S. policies on Arctic issues. King, an independent, and Murkowski, a Republican, on Wednesday announced the creation of an “Arctic Caucus” in the Senate. Both senators share the vision that the United States should play a leadership role in guiding international policy decisions that affect the Arctic. Read more
  • Eimskip boosts Portland-Halifax shipping calls

    Eimskip, the Icelandic shipping company that moved its U.S. port of call for its vessels to Portland from Norfolk, Va., is increasing the number of calls it makes to Halifax, Nova Scotia, from 13 to 31 calls per year. Read more
  • Maine’s manufacturers scared of dollar’s heights

    The surging buying power of the U.S. dollar has allowed consumers to benefit from cheaper imports and bargain-priced vacations abroad, but Maine’s manufacturers must now struggle to compete in a new global marketplace in which their products have suddenly become more costly. Read more
  • Eimskip moves to bring
 more cargo ships to Portland

    Icelandic steamship line Eimskip has changed its routes to allow for more frequent container shipments between Europe and Portland, and to provide direct service across the Atlantic without having to transfer containers in Iceland – important steps for boosting its business in North America. Read more
  • Maine opens office in Shanghai

    Maine’s exports to China include wood pulp for paper manufacturing and its famous lobster and seafood catch. Now with a newly opened office in Shanghai the New England state is going after more direct Chinese investment. Read more
  • Trade trend: More Maine food on world’s plates

    State exports double in six years, led by sales of potatoes, berries and seafood, especially to Asia. Read more
  • Census: Sea urchin, potato exports down but lobster, blueberry exports up in 2013

    New data from the U.S. Census Bureau show exports of Maine goods to other countries declined by 12 percent from 2012 to 2013. The data, released for all 50 states Thursday, show Maine exported about $2.68 billion worth of goods in 2013, a decline of $370 million from $3.05 billion in 2012. Exports to Canada, the state’s top trading partner, were up by 3.5 percent, an increase of $46 million for a total of $1.4 billion, but exports to China – a country state officials often have cited as having a large export growth potential – were down by 10 percent. Read more
  • Trade winds: Maine companies look to Asian growth markets

    Business between Maine and the Far East, particularly China, is heating up. Among the examples: one Portland-based company expects its Chinese subsidiary to turn a profit in the next couple years; another plans to soon test-market its product in China first ; and the Maine International Trade Center plans to open up a Shanghai office in the first quarter of 2015, possibly as early as January, to encourage Chinese foreign direct investment in Maine. Read more
  • ‘Big stick’ ideology may give the needed leverage in overseas business relationships

    As Maine companies seek to move business beyond their own shore, local law practices are guiding the way, vetting potential partners, assuring local and international laws and treaties are met, protecting intellectual property and handling disputes. Read more